Scotty Parker | A boy and his bike

Peter Conway (below left), known for biking across America, recently traveled to Honduras with Scotty Parker (above), the Parker family and Water Missions International’s staff to visit the communities Scotty’s “Ride for Water” bike campaign supported. One year ago, Scotty rode across South Carolina on his bike to raise awareness for those without safe water. His fundraising goal was $25,000, and he raised $69,000, enough to provide safe water for two communities in Honduras and a community in Africa. Conway wrote this guest post telling the story of their trip and the impact safe water has had on the communities. Continue Reading…

Ayilo Settlement Camp

When violence broke out in South Sudan in December 2013, tens of thousands of people fled into neighboring Uganda for safety. They are now housed in various settlements around Adjumani, approximately 440 kilometers north of Kampala, near the border with South Sudan. Continue Reading…

Malawi Floods Displacement Camp

I settle in at my desk, sip my steaming coffee and fire up the computer. Signing into my emails, I scroll through until I notice one from a partner in the field, Ina. She’s been in Malawi for a few days, amidst the disaster left behind after severe flooding, and sounds cheerful. Continue Reading…

Walk for Water volunteers set up bucket wallOn Saturday morning, Water Missions International hosted the 9th Annual Charleston Walk for Water at Brittlebank Park. Ryan Belk, a local photographer, took over our Instagram account for the day. We asked him to share about his experience at the walk. Read on as he recounts the day through his photography.

Continue Reading…

Why We Walk | Charleston Walk for Water 2015

In some of the areas where we work, we’ve found that women and children spend 2-3 hours walking to collect water every day. In most cases, the water source is between one to four miles from their home. To make matters worse, the water they collect is often not safe for drinking. Continue Reading…

People find shelter in displacement camps after Malawi flooding

As the waters recede and confine themselves once again to their natural home, the 336,000 people displaced in the southern region of Malawi face a challenging future. Severe rains hit Malawi early January covering most of the southern region and destroying the livelihood of 116,000 households. People fled their homes in an attempt to escape the floods. Many grabbed belongings and any food they could find, packed it into canoes, and started the long journey to safer ground. Those displaced are in for a six to eight month stay in displacement camps waiting for the unknown. With memories of severe flooding, panic, and fear, the call to just sit and wait is a tough one.

Continue Reading…

Immanuel Lutheran Church

Immanuel Lutheran Church in LaVernia, Texas

Two years ago, Sherrie Palan, a leader at Immanuel Lutheran Church in LaVernia, TX, was introduced to Water Missions at her denomination’s national convocation. Due to the drought conditions in Texas, she understood the need for safe water and was drawn to how “instantly” Water Missions’ systems bring safe water to communities. After sharing about the project with her church council, they decided to get involved in Water Sunday 2014.

Continue Reading…

Water Sunday 2015

Three years ago, Water Sunday began as a way to mobilize churches in providing safe water to the millions of people who do not have access to it. Since then, thousands of lives have been transformed all over the world. This April, Water Sunday will bring the body of Christ together to focus on the water crisis and we invite you to join us.

Continue Reading…

Severe flooding in Chikwawa, Malawi

With 176 dead and 200,000 displaced, people in Malawi continue to suffer from the worst flooding ever recorded in the country’s history. Constant heavy rainfall exacerbated by the Tropical Cyclone Bansi produced dangerous flooding in the southern region of the country. Over half of the state has been declared a disaster zone and the death toll is expected to rise. As people still trapped by the flood continue to fight for survival, UNICEF reached out to Water Missions International’s Malawi staff to help assess the situation. Continue Reading…

After the 2010 Haiti Earthquake
Five years is a long time, but the images of the devastation in Haiti as a result of the 2010 earthquake remain vivid in the minds of relief workers. About 50 WMI volunteers and staff workers delivered over 150 Living Water™ Treatment Systems to improve the lives of over 250,000 people impacted by the disaster. Here is a snapshot of WMI’s work in Haiti, arriving shortly after the earthquake on January 12, 2010.

Continue Reading…