People find shelter in displacement camps after Malawi flooding

As the waters recede and confine themselves once again to their natural home, the 336,000 people displaced in the southern region of Malawi face a challenging future. Severe rains hit Malawi early January covering most of the southern region and destroying the livelihood of 116,000 households. People fled their homes in an attempt to escape the floods. Many grabbed belongings and any food they could find, packed it into canoes, and started the long journey to safer ground. Those displaced are in for a six to eight month stay in displacement camps waiting for the unknown. With memories of severe flooding, panic, and fear, the call to just sit and wait is a tough one.

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Immanuel Lutheran Church

Immanuel Lutheran Church in LaVernia, Texas

Two years ago, Sherrie Palan, a leader at Immanuel Lutheran Church in LaVernia, TX, was introduced to Water Missions at her denomination’s national convocation. Due to the drought conditions in Texas, she understood the need for safe water and was drawn to how “instantly” Water Missions’ systems bring safe water to communities. After sharing about the project with her church council, they decided to get involved in Water Sunday 2014.

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Water Sunday 2015

Three years ago, Water Sunday began as a way to mobilize churches in providing safe water to the millions of people who do not have access to it. Since then, thousands of lives have been transformed all over the world. This April, Water Sunday will bring the body of Christ together to focus on the water crisis and we invite you to join us.

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Severe flooding in Chikwawa, Malawi

With 176 dead and 200,000 displaced, people in Malawi continue to suffer from the worst flooding ever recorded in the country’s history. Constant heavy rainfall exacerbated by the Tropical Cyclone Bansi produced dangerous flooding in the southern region of the country. Over half of the state has been declared a disaster zone and the death toll is expected to rise. As people still trapped by the flood continue to fight for survival, UNICEF reached out to Water Missions International’s Malawi staff to help assess the situation. Continue Reading…

After the 2010 Haiti Earthquake
Five years is a long time, but the images of the devastation in Haiti as a result of the 2010 earthquake remain vivid in the minds of relief workers. About 50 WMI volunteers and staff workers delivered over 150 Living Water™ Treatment Systems to improve the lives of over 250,000 people impacted by the disaster. Here is a snapshot of WMI’s work in Haiti, arriving shortly after the earthquake on January 12, 2010.

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An Eight Hour Trek Every Day

Before safe water was brought to Mount Paka, women spent the majority of their day walking to the closest water source: a sand dam several miles away. It was a three hour walk down Mount Paka and a five hour walk back up, totaling eight hours every day for the women in this remote village. Continue Reading…

The Mount Paka project challenged our engineers.

You’ve read the story of the isolated community of Mount Paka, Kenya, and the Pokot tribe that received safe water this September through Water Missions International, but what you may not know are the difficulties that arose in the two-and-a-half year design and implementation process. Continue Reading…

6 Ways to Give Joy This Christmas | Christmas Catalog 2014

At Water Missions, we’ve discovered that joy sometimes comes packaged differently than you might expect. Think solar panels, concrete latrines, and guys on motorcycles delivering water. A little different, right? Below are six ways you can spread joy this holiday season with impacts that stretch a lifetime. Continue Reading…

Ebola Virus Poster | Dolo Town, Liberia

This week, Ebola Fighters were named TIME’s choice for Person of the Year 2014 “for tireless acts of courage and mercy… for risking, for persisting, for sacrificing and saving,” wrote “Person of the Year” author Nancy Gibbs.

And while healthcare workers immediately come to mind as those that are leading the fight against Ebola, there are others, such as the Water Missions International engineers on the ground in Liberia, whose efforts are also contributing to slowing the spread of the deadly disease.

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Burundi Photo in Hallway

In the lobby of Water Missions International Headquarters hangs a picture of a small village named Katobo located in in rural Burundi. Katabo is home to the Batwa, an indigenous pygmy people who make up less than one percent of the total population of Burundi. The Batwa, once respected hunters and gatherers, lost their livelihoods because of government concerns about the destruction of the rainforest. The Batwa live in extreme poverty and inhabit the most dry, arid land in Burundi – making finding fresh water a significant challenge, a challenge that often falls on the shoulders of the children. Continue Reading…