Pokhari girl drinks safe water | Nepal Earthquake

Over the weekend, our team in Nepal diligently worked to bring the people of Pokhari safe water after the devastating earthquake on April 25th. Photographer Bobby Neptune documents the difficult journey to see safe water flowing.

For hours, our truck undulated back and forth over the rough roads. There is a point where the bones in your body begin to creak and moan from the pain of the endless hiccupping from one pothole to the next. We were on our way to Pokhari, a small village south of Gorkha town in east central Nepal. Continue Reading…

Pokhari, Nepal | Nepal Earthquake Devastation

It’s now been 20 days since the devastating 7.8 magnitude earthquake that shook the country of Nepal. Since then, our team has flown in, shipped dozens of water treatment systems over, endured more quakes, and traveled to communities with the most urgent needs. Continue Reading…

A mother and her sons.

Jennifer Lawson and her husband Doug are currently serving with Water Missions in Uganda. Jennifer is a mother to two young boys and was kind enough to be a guest writer for us this week as we celebrate mothers around the world for Mother’s Day. 

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Nepal Earthquake | View of the Himalayas

Craig Williams, Water Missions’ Logistics Director, is in Nepal following April 25th’s devastating earthquake. Senior Technician Tosa Surbakti and Project Engineer Tim Darms have joined him to begin assessing communities’ needs as they await Water Missions equipment in transit. Below is the most recent communications we have received from him.

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Craig_Williams_Nepal-10

Craig Williams, Water Missions’ Logistics Director, has been on the ground in Nepal since Sunday. Late last night we received communication from him with an extended update on how the relief efforts are going. His story provides insight into what the life of a relief worker in the midst of disaster looks like.

 

After two full days on the ground our operations are now falling into place. Our partnerships are emerging and we have a sense of direction for where we will be responding. Continue Reading…

Scotty Parker | A boy and his bike

Peter Conway (below left), known for biking across America, recently traveled to Honduras with Scotty Parker (above), the Parker family and Water Missions International’s staff to visit the communities Scotty’s “Ride for Water” bike campaign supported. One year ago, Scotty rode across South Carolina on his bike to raise awareness for those without safe water. His fundraising goal was $25,000, and he raised $69,000, enough to provide safe water for two communities in Honduras and a community in Africa. Conway wrote this guest post telling the story of their trip and the impact safe water has had on the communities. Continue Reading…

Ayilo Settlement Camp

When violence broke out in South Sudan in December 2013, tens of thousands of people fled into neighboring Uganda for safety. They are now housed in various settlements around Adjumani, approximately 440 kilometers north of Kampala, near the border with South Sudan. Continue Reading…

Malawi Floods Displacement Camp

I settle in at my desk, sip my steaming coffee and fire up the computer. Signing into my emails, I scroll through until I notice one from a partner in the field, Ina. She’s been in Malawi for a few days, amidst the disaster left behind after severe flooding, and sounds cheerful. Continue Reading…

Walk for Water volunteers set up bucket wallOn Saturday morning, Water Missions International hosted the 9th Annual Charleston Walk for Water at Brittlebank Park. Ryan Belk, a local photographer, took over our Instagram account for the day. We asked him to share about his experience at the walk. Read on as he recounts the day through his photography.

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Why We Walk | #NoRunningCHS

Tara Jones —  March 10, 2015

Why We Walk | Charleston Walk for Water 2015

In some of the areas where we work, we’ve found that women and children spend 2-3 hours walking to collect water every day. In most cases, the water source is between one to four miles from their home. To make matters worse, the water they collect is often not safe for drinking. Continue Reading…